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Death predicting supercomputer vs last two digits method
The latest news reads 'Scientists have developed a supercomputer that can predict with 96 per cent probability if a person is about to die. Now, haven't we tasted the same thrill with the 'last two digits' method discovered by this citizen journalist (Prasant Nair) from India?
The last two digits of a person's birth year plays a crucial role in his death. On the death date, those two digits are found in the reverse digits order. Reverse digit, in most of the day to day events, including sports and election, results in severe weakness. When the person is already ill, admitted to the hospital, his nearing death can be predicted with above 96 per cent accuracy with this 'last two digits'.

This method was discovered and applied for the first time when Bengali film actress Suchitra Sen was admitted to the hospital. Her death date was predicted as Jan 17, using this last two digits method. Her birth year was 1931, generating the death digits as 13.

Number 13 and 26 (resembling 76) represent powerful half digit pairs. And her death date matrix pattern had a 76 on the right vertical-

17

16= 33

And recently, the same method was used to predict the death date of infamous terrorist Yakub Memon. The last digits of his birth year 1962 = 62. Its half digit number= 31 were seen on the nearest date July 30, 2015, which had this pattern-

30

18= 48

Hence, his death date was predicted as the same. It turned true to perfection.

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