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Google marks astronomical phenomenon of Geminid meteor shower with a video doodle
This year, the best appearance of the Geminid meteor shower in the sky is on December 13 and 14 which is considered to be an awaited phenomenon by astronomers as well as sky-gazers. A lot of shooting stars are going to be seen in this period.

Since the meteor shower appears to come from the constellation Gemini, it has been given the name 'Geminid meteor shower' which often appears yellowish in hue most time of the event.

Internet search engine giant Google marks the spectacular sky event by illustrating it with a video consisting of slides working as a series of successive doodles on its home page which one can click on and watch to watch the slides. On the home page logo of Google, the second 'O' has been depicted as the Sun.

According to astronomers, the Geminids consists of a meteor shower caused by the object 3200 Phaethon - a Palladian asteroid with a 'rock comet orbit'. In other words, the shooting stars as a major meteor showers originate from a slow moving comet making the event last for two days making it the most consistent and active annual meteor shower.

The event is periodic in nature which often peak around mid-December for two days with highest intensity on the second day. It has been that the intensity of shooting stars is increasing every year with around 150 showers per hour under optimal conditions during late at night and in the wee hours.

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