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Google marks Nobel winning physicist S Chandrasekhar's birth anniversary with a doodle
Internet search engine giant and technology company Google celebrates the 107th birth anniversary of Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, the Nobel prize winning astrophysicist and mathematician of Indian origin with a doodle.

The interactive doodle in black and white shows Google logo's second 'o' replaced with the head of the scientist who gave a theory on evolution of stars.

Indian-American astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar (born October 19, 1910) belonged to a big family and his father C Subrahmanyan Ayyar worked with the Northwestern Railways under British rule. He was nephew of Indian Nobel prize winner physicist CV Raman. He died on 1995 in Chicago at the age of 82 years.

He studied at Presidency College, Madras and the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. However, he spent most of his career at the University of Chicago in the US.

He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1983 along with William A Fowler "for his theoretical studies of the physical processes of importance to the structure and evolution of the stars". One of his most noteworthy researches were related to the radiation of energy from dying stars known as 'white stars'.

His fundamental work led to development of theoretical models of the later evolutionary stages of massive stars and black holes and astrophysics term the 'Chandrasekhar Limit' got named after him.

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