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Missing children: Govt's promises and claims are hollow
An advertisement communicating launching of a new programme relating to children's health had appeared recently, in number of newspapers. Almost daily, we see the advertisement of starting of welfare programmes for the masses but still a major part of our population is crying for their welfare, and the Supreme Court has to issue directions because of the reason that such advertisements are not practical.

Likewise, the concern of Supreme Court with regard to missing children is genuine. In fact, neither the state governments nor the local police are paying any attention towards the missing children - as a result incidents related to missing children are on the rise. In the petition filed by an NGO – Bachpan Bachao Andolan – the court has been informed that everyday about 100 children are missing and nothing could be known about them.

According to an survey, between 2010 and 2012, more than one lakh children were missing and police could not trace most of them. These statistics are tabulated on the basis of cases registered with the police and the figure might go high with the addition of unreported and unregistered cases. There is no surprise if the figure increases.

Last year, a big racket of child-lifters was busted by the police at Banglore, which used to put them on begging work by giving them intoxicant drugs. There are a number of such gangs working in the country because they are aware of the weaknesses of the administration.

In fact, our society is quite lazy and unemotional. We listen to the “Bal Leela” of Krishan with great interest but the atrocities on the children in front of eyes and their cries do not reach our ears.

In the event of missing children from public places or kidnapping in the name of ransom, the police seems to be little active. But in cases where children are lifted by the hired gangs and later on sold or put in bonded labour or immoral trafficking, the role of police is not appreciable. Till such time the NGOs or welfare societies are formed or the poor parents do not raise their voice, the administration does not seem to be in action. This is the reason; the courts have to interfere in such cases.

The courts had ordered for the appearance of chief secretaries of Gujarat, Tamil Nadu, Arunachal Pardesh, Goa and Odisha, personally in the courts, for Febrauary 17, to submit reply, in the PIL filed in the case of missing children but it is unfortunate that none of the chief secretaries appeared in the court, and Justice Altmas Kabir has shown his displeasure.

He had even said to this extent that for their appearance, non-bailable warrants have to be issued. Justice Kabir lambasted the advocates who appeared on behalf of the states, and said, “What do you think, we pass orders only for the sake of orders.” He also said, nobody is worried about the missing children.

All the Chief Secretaries have now been ordered to appear in the court personally on February 19 and it is a separate issue as to whether they are in a position to give satisfactory reply in the case of investigations of missing children. But the carelessness shown by these states, it is crystal clear that Government’s promises and claims are hollow.

Editorial NOTE: This article is categorized under Opinion Section. The views expressed in this article are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of merinews.com. In case you have a opposing view, please click here to share the same in the comments section.
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