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Study: New Zealand's yellow-eyed penguins face the risk of extinction
A study published in international journal PeerJ has claimed that one of the rarest penguin species, the ones with the yellow eyes, will become extinct by 2060 unless we take steps to conserve them.

The research has been conducted by a group of researchers from the University of Otago. The subjects of the study were the yellow-eyed penguins found on the mainland of New Zealand.

The yellow-eyed penguins (YEP) are listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

The significance of human impacts in the form of deforestation of breeding habitat, capture by collectors, egging, and shooting of adults on the YEP population was highlighted early by Richdale (1951). While these impacts are no longer an issue, unregulated tourism has become an important threat at some yellow-eyed penguin colonies and is reflected in reduced breeding performance and a steady decline of local penguin numbers.

The researchers also warned that climate change is drastically affecting the chances of the survival of YEP and also warned that "future climatic conditions will not be favorable for a recovery of the YEP population."

The researchers have also warned about local factors affecting the survival chances as well as conservation efforts for the YEPs.

"While climate change is a global phenomenon that is both inevitable and quantifiable, it is important to bear in mind its impact on species population trends is relative to other more regional factors, such as, in the case of penguins, fisheries, pollution, habitat destruction, introduced terrestrial predators, and human disturbance," the research said.

The researchers also added that by managing local and regional factors, the resilience of species towards increasing pressure from climate change can be improved.

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