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Why Should India Have Hindi as its National Language?
Last week there was a sudden uproar when there was a directive from Modi Govt's asking ministers and officials to use Hindi in their social media updates that triggered a massive controversy. The directives says both Hindi and English can be used, but suggest that Hindi should be "written above or first".

Apart from Politicians like Jayalaitha, Karunanidhi, Omar Abdullah and parties like Congress and CPI-M aligned to oppose the move by NDA, even the netizens like zuckerbergians and twitterattis also expressed some mixed reactions. Some were welcoming the move by Govt. while some were in line with above parties and politicians.

And when heard Shocking words of ex-I&B Minister Manish Tiwari-"language in this age is irrelevant and Hindi promotion will take India back to medieval times". I was totally stunned.

First, the directives was actually issued by UPA Govt. and backtracked may be for forth coming elections which was evident from a circular issued by UPA on 10th March 2014. So there should be a limit to double standards of Congress!

Second, is pushing Hindi a widely spoken also one of our official languages will take us to vintage era? Simply a height of insensitive attitude!!

Anyway, I admit that no Nation is as diverse and as mottled as India when its lingua-franca is concerned. Language is one of the most interesting affirmations of our diversity.We have different scripts, language and dialects. In fact our constitution also recognizes 23 languages. We consider our regional languages as our mother tongue.

No language enjoys majority status in India, though Hindi tops the list as widely spoken language. Thanks in part to the popularity of Bollywood. Hindi is understood, if not always well spoken by nearly half our population. In Every corner of India including Northeast one can find a person who can speak or at least understand Hindi due its easy infiltrating nature. And the proliferation of Hindi TV channels along with you tubes, internet etc has made the spoken language more accessible to many non-native speakers.

Every country has a linguistic identity. French speak French, the Germans speak German, and Chinese speak Chinese but Indians speak Punjabi, or Gujarati, or Tamil etc. Though it doesn't make us less Indian but shouldn't we have a language to represent our Linguistic identity in a Global arena?

Hindi and English are India's official languages, not its national languages.But In reality Hindi (with its easiness)  has become the main indigenous language of India and the lingua franca connecting everybody‚Ķmaking itself the de facto national language.

India's real problem is that English as a language of elite have persistently kept us hermetically sealed from our Indian language roots, our culture and our Indianness.

While observing some reticent responses in regard  for promoting Hindi from around I was actually thinking about the plights of Shashi (Sridevi) - the lead character in Gouri Shindhe's movie English Vinglish.

 Isn't it a fact that if someone doesn't know English how best he/she speaks Hindi or any other regional language - still looked down upon??

My Son almost every day narrates how any of his classmates reprimanded (mildly) for speaking Hindi in school premises. Does it look logical?

Surely Hindi needs a push. We cannot dilute the fact that India has sunk lower than the depths and cannotafford more dragging lower.

Let me represent some facts collected from various sources while researching this.  Linguists and scholars now estimate that Hindi is the third most spoken and understood language on the planet after English and Mandarin Chinese and ahead of Spanish.

The Government of the United States has designated Hindi a 'super-critical needs language,' which is the topmost category for languages that it believes, will be of great importance in the new century, putting it in the same category as Chinese.

 As part of its National Security Language Initiative, the Federal Government has called for more US universities to start teaching and more Americans to start learning Hindi so that the United States can better prepare itself for the challenges and opportunities of the new century.

China has already introduced Hindi in many of its universities. Hindi is also expected to be one of the five or six languages that will be truly global languages in the rapidly changing world in this century.

What an Irony! While globally Hindi as a language getting prominence but in its own land it is facing outrage and plunge to become the India's linguistic Identity.   

When foreigners coming to India can learn Hindi why can't Indian people do so?  

I earnestly feel that Sanskrit should have been in place of Hindi along with English as official language. But it is not the case. So let it be Hindi‚Ķand push it to a status of National Language so that it can be strengthen itself.   

Contemporary India's inclusive, plural and liberal linguistic ethos is firmly well-established. I don't think I will anyway become less Odia (Odia is my mother tongue) or Indian. Just because Hindi becomes our National Language!!!!

Editorial NOTE: This article is categorized under Opinion Section. The views expressed in this article are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of merinews.com. In case you have a opposing view, please click here to share the same in the comments section.
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