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Celebrating the Rakshabandhan- My way
Partha Sengupta | 08 Aug 2009

All Indian males would be having a sister, at least a cousin sister, or even 'foster' sister (Mooh-boli-behen). Therefore, Rakshabandhan is something the whole country look forward to. It started as a Hindu festival, and is practiced also with Puja and fo

All Indian males would be having a sister, at least a cousin sister, or even ‘foster’ sister (Mooh-boli-behen). Therefore, Rakshabandhan is something the whole country look forward to. It started as a Hindu festival, and is practiced also with Puja and following up with the festivity. However, helped by some of our great statesmen, it crossed the barrier of religion and emerged as a common Indian festival since brotherly-sisterly love does not know any barrier. But there are fun sides as well.

During the early part of the day, I certainly realized for quite a few years, I am not wearing a Rakhi from my sister. We stay a long distance apart. There are problems of logistics, leaves, other difficulties in movement (though managed a belated Bhatri-dwitia or Bhai-phonta,  a few tears back. I called her up and said that I am missing it, and I would buy one on behalf of her and tie it. During childhood days, I had done quite a few things for her and got punished (sometimes through a treacherous change of mind of hers), buying a Rakhi and wearing it, by use of teeth, was Child’d play. Obviously, It was an emotional moment. However, when I was pondering, some other nice anecdotes came rushing in, and let me share those.

Sometime back I wrote about this function in college days- no harm in repeating it for new readers. Rakshabandhan day in college was a dreaded day for the Romeo brigade, which practically were all of us, except a few lucky ones (the serious ones later turned out to be most unlucky ones). You never know from where a Rakhi will pop out from the vanity bag or a purse. I will also never forget the movie “Zaharila Insaan”, in which Rishi Kapoor forced by his favourite teacher (Pran) was forced to abandon his lady-love (Mousumi Chatterjee) comes and says “Main Tumhare liye Zahar Laya Hoon” (I have brought poison for you) and gives her a small box. The content turns out to be a Rakhi.

Today whenever, you hear the term Rakhi, unfortunately, the name of some disturbing TV program comes to our minds. This is another pity that you cannot get away from some TV programs, even if you decided to sit 50 metres away from the TV. But, let us forget about that for now.

So, after I bought the Rakhi on behalf of my sister and tied it,  I decided to carry out another ritual. I bought another Rakhi, on behalf of the multitude of all girls and women, who, at some point of time in my life, was considered a potential girl-friend / wife, even if for a few hours- (some were like that) or for a few days (most were like that) and tied it on my hand.

So, O Julie, O shiela, Rani, Jamalo – Long live our brother and sisterhood.