2017  
  2016  
  2015  
  2014  
  2013  
  2012  
  2011  
  2010  
  2009  
  2008  
  2007  
  2006  
Keep Your Promises To World's Children
Child Labour | 14 Mar 2008

07 July 2007 (07.07.07) marks the midway to the international community’s commitments for creating a better world for its citizens. What have we achieved is the BIG QUESTION now.

Keep your Promises to World's  Children


Keep Your Promises to World's Children

There are so many pressing human needs - it is hard to prioritise them. We need to combat HIV and other epidemic diseases, as well as terrorism, drug trafficking, and military conflicts. We need clean water, sanitation, health care and immunisations, and adequate nutrition - not to mention environmental protection and
an adequate standard of living. The list goes on and is daunting. But, we ought to think of not only how many human rights issues are linked to child labour, but how many of these issues can be
addressed by redirecting millions child labourers to school - for example, HIV education, immunisations, nutrition, etc. Quality education can make an important contribution to a culture of global tolerance and world peace and security.

07 July 2007 (07.07.07) marks the midway to the international community’s commitments for creating a better world for its citizens. What have we achieved is the BIG QUESTION now.

Points of Concern

The first MDG target – to get as many girls as boys into primary and secondary school by 2005 – was missed in over 90 countries. In countries such as Niger and Burkina Faso, only one in three girls go to school at all.

In 2006, failure to reach the 2005 MDG gender-parity target will result in over 1 million unnecessary child and maternal deaths. Educated women have greater knowledge about health issues and greater bargaining power in the household, which has a positive impact on their own health and that of their children.

HIV/AIDS infection rates double among young people who do not finish primary school. If every girl and boy received a complete primary education, at least seven million new cases of HIV could be prevented in a decade.

In many countries, school fees are a major barrier that prevents children – especially girls – from going to school. When school fees were abolished in Uganda, Tanzania, and Kenya, seven million additional children – many of them girls –- entered school in these three countries alone.

Well-trained and well-supported teachers are essential to providing good-quality education for girls and boys. However, there is currently a global shortage of two million teachers, and at least 15 million new teachers will be needed between now and 2015 in order to achieve education for all.
Globally, an extra $7-17 billion per year is still needed to enable all girls and boys to receive a quality primary education.

We want to know what you think about this issue

Which MDG do you believe is the most achievable of all?

Can we achieve education for all in 2015?
If no what should be the change is strategy?

To know more about on this article

http://globalmarch.org/campaigns/keepyourpromises/index.php