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Wireless energy: Scientists send electricity 55 meters away through air
Rohit Dhyani | 18 Mar 2015

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has been working for years on the Space Solar Power Systems mission (SSPS). US department of energy and NASA supported Japan's SSPS mission. But it was found too costly and shut down in the 1980s. It includes financial incentives for solar power and solar installation targets on the earth.

Japan has found a way to get rid of electric polls and wires. A group of Japanese scientists have succeeded in transmiting electric power wirelessly to a pinpoint target using microwaves. They made a breakthrough move towards developing new energy source for humans in the future.

Scientists have announced with much fanfare that they had pulled off an impressive feat of transmiting 1.8 kilowatts of electric power into microwaves through the air and transmit it with accuracy into a receiver located 55 meters away. They had taken an idea that satellite-based solar panels can capture the energy around the clock and are not affected by weather conditions. It is an advance technology that brings space based solar power closer to reality.

According to a latest report from Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), using this technology in future energy will be sent on earth from space. This is the first time as a two- kilowatt power microwaves through large amounts manages to send a small target.

The International Space Station and several other satellites have been able to generate solar energy and use it for retaining work. In space based solar energy generation, sunlight is gathered in geostationary orbit and transmitted to a receiver on the Earth. Unlike solar panels arranged on the Earth, satellite-based solar panels can seize the energy around the clock and are not affected by weather conditions.

Japanese scientists are trying to put such power on earth, but the Japanese scientists are claiming to discover that will bring electricity to Earth from space.

Scientists are aware of the challenges of the thoroughfare. If this project will be implemented, microwave transmitting solar panel would be set up on the 36,000 kilometers from Earth. According to from Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), a receiver set up on Earth with an approximately 3 Kilometer radius could create up to 1GW of electricity, about to same as one nuclear reactor.

This structure is not easy to install and put the power to the earth's ground. Scientists will have to think about the massive structures in the sky, Will find the ways to make them and their maintenance.

Dr Peter Glaser introduced the idea of supply solar energy from space for use on the Earth in 1968. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has been working for years on the Space Solar Power Systems mission (SSPS). US department of energy and NASA supported Japan's SSPS mission. But it was found too costly and shut down in the 1980s. It includes financial incentives for solar power and solar installation targets on the earth.

In 2009, Japan had started giving financial support to the mission. But when it comes to an island country like Japan, which is built out of island on reclaimed land. Since 2011 Fukushima disaster in the country appeared to have vindicated the country environmentalist' decade-old rant against unregulated development and the destruction of hills and mangroves throughout nuclear energy.

After Fukushima disaster a debates has been raised in the Japan about the issue of nuclear energy. Now Tokyo is trying to find a way to brand with new energy through SSPS mission.

Bio: Rohit Dhyani is a senior print journalist based in New Delhi, India. He has done Masters in Journalism with a specialisation in Business Journalism from Indian Institute of Journalism and New Media, Bangalore, (IIJNM). Rohit Dhyani is passionate about environment journalism. He has been associated with such organisations such as The Climate Reality Project 2015 by Nobel Laureate Al-Gore. His head rests in the Library and heart lies in the Theatre.